Mount and Blade II: Bannerlord Decisions Evolves Politics

The Mount and Blade 2: Bannerlord decisions system has been revealed by the developers, detailing a significant change to the game’s political system that adds even more depth to yet another aspect of this upcoming game.

If you’re unfamiliar with Mount and Blade 2: Bannerlord, it’s something that’s well worth checking out. The Mount and Blade games are mainly focused in the fictional land of Calradia where several kingdoms are vying for power over the entire land. The player becomes the wrench in the works, ultimately deciding which of the game’s factions reigns supreme — or taking the reins themselves.

Now, yet another brand-new system has been detailed which spells out a pretty intriguing improvement over the predecessor Mount and Blade: Warband.

How the Mount and Blade 2: Bannerlord Decisions System Works

In previous games, important decisions with far-reaching consequences were often made based largely on your relationship with the faction’s leader and some other external factors. Now, things are going to be changing up a bit in the sequel.

To start, the Mount and Blade 2: Bannerlord decisions covers four different types of decisions:

  • Kingdom Laws / Policies
  • War / Peace decisions
  • Annexation
  • Clan expulsion

In any of these cases, a clan leader must put forth the desire to have something decided; this person will be noted as the “Sponsor” of one of these decisions. These can range from things like national policy to who gets the city that your soldiers just captured.

Once a decision is proposed, clan leaders will vote either for or against the proposal, gaining and losing favor with the other factions within a kingdom depending on the decision you make. The choice will ultimately come down to the king or queen — this is a feudal system, after all — but it’s not quite as simple as that.

A nation’s rules has to spend influence in order to permit or deny one of these items in the Mount and Blade 2: Bannerlord decisions system. Making the unpopular choice will be much more difficult than the popular one, and a misstep here can potentially draw the ire of your underlings.

This improved system is certainly a step up from the king or queen simply ruling by fiat with no apparent input from their lords; it will be quite interesting to see how it actually plays out. You can find out for yourself when Mount and Blade 2: Bannerlord launches sometime in March 2020. In the meantime, why not add it to your wishlist on Steam?

What do you think of the Mount and Blade 2: Bannerlord decisions? Are you looking forward to a deeper exploration of medieval political intrigue? Let us know in the comments below!

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